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More treatment options for alopecia areata

Posted by Admin, on June 6th, 2008, under ALOPECIA AREATA

BEFORE AND AFTER TREATMENT AT THE HAIR CENTRE 

These results were achieved with a combination of treatment therapy.

Topical immunotherapy

It is thought that topical immunotherapy is the most effective option for people with extensive alopecia areata. However, this treatment is only done by some skin specialist and so you will need to be referred to one of these specialists for it.

How topical immunotherapy works is not clear. A substance is put on affected skin to to make the skin react like an allergy. The most commonly used substance is DPCP (diphencyprone). Increasing strengths of this substance are placed on the affected skin once a week over several weeks until the skin looks like it has mild dermatitis (eczema). The skin reaction seems to affect the process involved in causing alopecia areata in some way to allow hair to re-grow. Side-effects from topical immunotherapy can be troublesome. For example, some people develop severe skin reactions. Treating children with topical immunotherapy is controversial.

In a large study of people with extensive alopecia areata, topical immunotherapy caused good hair re-growth in 3 in 10 cases after six months which increased to nearly 8 in 10 cases after 32 months of treatment. (It worked less well in people with alopecia totalis or alopecia universalis.) In those where it works, initial re-growth does not occur for 12-24 weeks. Once re-growth occurs, treatment can be stopped but in many cases the hair loss then recurs. Therefore, in many cases, regular maintenance treatment is needed to keep the hair loss from returning.
 

Dithranol

Dithranol is thought to be less effective than topical immunotherapy, but works in some cases. It is applied each day to the whole scalp if there is extensive hair loss and left for 20-60 minutes before washing it off. One study showed that it helps hair re-growth in about 1 in 4 cases, but takes many weeks of treatment. Side-effects such as itchiness, redness, and scaling are common with dithranol. Dithranol is not widely used for alopecia areata because it is messy to use.

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Hair cloning may help cure premature baldness

Posted by Admin, on June 5th, 2008, under HAIR LOSS SCIENCE

For people worried about their premature hair loss, scientists have pioneered a technique that would help provide a cure – hair cloning.

The new technique, known as follicular cell implantation works by replicating remaining hair strands and would eventually help millions of people to regain a full head of their own hair. It can potentially re-grow a limitless supply hair for individuals who have become bald during cancer treatment, from suffering severe burns, or simply the onset of age, reports the Telegraph

The cell therapy, during clinical trials, increased hair count in at least two thirds of patients after six months, and four out of five if the scalp is stimulated beforehand through gentle abrasions, which encourage hair growth.

The new technique is a breakthrough in hair restoration and has been granted 1.9 million pounds by the government. The procedure is being developed by Intercytex, a British company based in Manchester.

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Naomi Campbell going bald

Posted by Gary Heron, on June 4th, 2008, under CELEBRITY HAIR LOSS

Supermodel Naomi Campbell is going bald because she has been getting hair extensions despite warnings that their regular use could lead to hair loss.

Naomi, 38, was photographed with a bald patch this week outside London’s Heathrow police station.

Fashion photographer and ex-model Huggy Ragnarsson, 44, who worked with Naomi at the height of her career, has revealed that Naomi started losing her hair 15 years ago, reports the sun.co.uk.Huggy told The Sun: “She has been losing hair for a while. The hair stylist Sam McKnight said to me in the nineties, ‘She’d better be careful with those weaves, she’s going to lose her hair’.”

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Lab-grown cells “cure baldness”

Posted by Admin, on June 3rd, 2008, under HAIR LOSS SCIENCE

Remaining hair cells are multiplied to fill bald areas Cells grown in the laboratory may offer a possible solution to hair loss, preliminary trials have suggested.

The technique involves taking small amounts of the remaining hair cells, multiplying them, then injecting them into bald areas.

Six months after treatment, 11 out of 19 patients had grown new hair, UK researchers told an Italian conference.

However, a UK specialist said further work would be needed so that the new hair looked right.

“It will revolutionise hair care, I think”

Dr Paul Kemp, Intercytex

Hair loss affects two-fifths of men over 50, and can be a long-term problem for some people following radiotherapy or burns.

Currently available methods of hair transplantation involve taking large clumps of remaining follicles under local anaesthetic and moving them to the desired area, a technique dependent on the amount of hair left, as no new hair is created.

The new method, called “follicular cell implantation”, developed by UK firm Intercytex, claims to be able to provide a limitless supply of replacement hair cells, and, if other trials show it to be safe and effective, could be available within five years.

Doctors take only the dermal papilla cells – cells found in the follicle which are responsible for hair growth.

They are harvested from areas on the back of the head, which usually still have hair growth, and then bathed in a specially-developed chemical in the laboratory, before being placed back into bald areas of the scalp.

The early results suggest that most patients appear to benefit after just a few months, although the numbers involved in the trial are relatively small.

Dr Paul Kemp, Intercytex’s Scientific Officer, said that the presence of the dermal papilla cells encouraged skin cells to start building a brand new hair follicle, or rejuvenated follicles which have stopped producing hair properly.

He said: “It will revolutionise hair care, I think. People will use this when they are starting to go bald – they’ll come and see us, we’ll take a few dermal papilla cells, grow them up in the lab, freeze most of them, and inject some.

“They can keep coming back as the balding process continues. I’m convinced it will work, it’s just a question of fine-tuning the technique.”

Other organs

He said that the same principles could one day be harnessed to grow replacement teeth, or other organs.

“Every hair is a tiny little organ, after all.”

Professor Val Randall, from the University of Bradford, said that the progress made was “exciting”.

She said: “To get anything growing at all is a real achievement, although it will be difficult to make the hair come back in the right way, pointing in the right direction, with the hair follicles lined up the right way.”

Dr Andrew Messenger, a consultant dermatologist at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, said that if new hair follicles had been produced, then it would constitute an advance.

However, he added: “We don’t yet know for certain whether these are new hair follicles, and it’s actually quite hard to prove that they are, not just the result of rubbing on the scalp or another effect.”

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7431092.stm

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NOW HAIR CLONING TO TREAT BALDNESS

Posted by Admin, on June 2nd, 2008, under HAIR LOSS SCIENCE

If clumps of your hair suddenly start falling out due to a common form of premature baldness, please don’t fret - scientists have pioneered a treatment to clone hair.

According to them, the technique, known as follicular cell implantation, works by replicating remaining hair strands and it could eventually help bald people to regain a full head of their own hair, The Daily Telegraph reported.

In fact, the technique has the potential to re-grow a limitless supply of hair for individuals who have become bald during cancer treatment, from suffering severe burns, or the onset of age, the researchers said.

However, the treatment may require more than 1,000 tiny injections to produce that number of hairs in extensively bald patients, but it promises to be quicker and less invasive than current hair transplant techniques.

The procedure is being developed by Intercytex, a British company based in Manchester, which is among many competing to find a cure for hair loss — a condition which affects 40 per cent of men over 50.

Trial results have indicated that the cell therapy can increase hair count in at least two thirds of patients after six months, and four out of five if the scalp is stimulated beforehand through gentle abrasions which encourage growth.

The therapy could be made available to patients within five years, the researchers hoped.  

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